#3, #5, #12: The Virtuous Woman, Victory, and Music (Unknown)

#3: The Virtuous Woman

#5: Victory

#12: Music

3. The Virtuous Woman (Unknown)

3. The Virtuous Woman (Unknown)

#3: The Virtuous Woman

The central subject in the middle lancet is a blue-mantled woman holding fruit, with blue sky behind her head. Less realistic, beneath, are a cross, crown of thorns, spear, and perhaps a stalk of hyssop. Above are watch towers, temple and crown. Topmost is a sheaf of grain. The side lancets are less pictorial and more geometric and symbolic. The symbols are the Star of David and an omega on the left, and a chalice and HIS on the right.

The person memorialized is Mrs. Lucy Ann Goodman (1827-1886) and the donors and memorialized persons of seven windows (# 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13) belonged to members of the “Grandin-Piatt clan”, as one member, the late Mrs. Anna Louise Baldwin, called them in an account she wrote of the “windows given by my grandfather’s family.”

Although Mrs. Baldwin stated that this window was given by the children, the Vestry Minutes record that William Augustus Goodman, vestryman and warden, requested permission to put in a window to the memory of his wife, Lucy Ann, and her mother, Hannah Grandin. Plainly the regard for mother and wife is expressed in the inscription, “her children shall rise up and call her blessed” (Proverbs 31:28) The passage continues with “her husband also, and he praiseth her,” and “Give her the fruit of her hands’ and let her works praise her in the gates.”

The artist/manufacturer is not known. This is one of the oldest windows in the church and was probably installed soon after the death of Lucy Ann Goodman (1886). Various types of glass have been assembled, with color combinations appearing richer in the central lancet. With the sun shining through this south end of the transept some of the components sparkle brightly and cast colorful spectra on the nearby columns, pews and floor.

A possible maker of this window was William Coulter & Son, a Cincinnati company prominent from 1840 to 1900, established by the great-grandfather of Miss Roberta Moore Gibson, church member.
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5. Victory (Unknown)

5. Victory (Unknown)

#5: Victory

The absence of any record that might explain the selection of symbols and designs assembled in this window invites interpretations such as this, offered by one of the members of the church questioned about it. As your eyes move from left to right, you find hope (anchor) in the left lancet. Then, in the middle lancet triumphant rejoicing (palms) are surmounted by humialiation and suffering (cross and thorny crown). On the right, we find victory (regal crown). Mary’s influence (fleur-de-lis in both side lancets) underlies hope and victory.

The person memorialized is Dr. Thomas Jefferson Orr (1810-1873). The donor is possibly his widow or children. A son, Dr. George Burnet Orr (grandfather of Anna Louise Baldwin mentioned in Window #3) was 32 at the time of his father’s death and subsequently occupied the chairs of surgery in the two Cincinnati Medical Schools.

The artist/manufacturer is unknown. It may have been installed when the church was widened (1884) and so would antedate #3 “The Virtuous Woman” by a few years. Features of these two windows suggest they were contemporary and may have had the same manufacturer.
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12 Music (Unknown)

12 Music (Unknown)

#12: Music

Central is the stringed instrument symbolic of music, the use of which can make expressions of joy and other emotions, praise, thanks and worship more effective.

The person memorialized is William A. Fillmore, organist (1836-1886) and the donor is “The Sunday School of this Parish.”

The artist/manufacturer is not known. If installed soon after Mr. Fillmore’s death, it would be contemporary with windows #3 and #5, and its style is consistent with these. The musical theme is enhanced by the vibrant light transmitted by the glass.
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